<xmp id="akwuq"><optgroup id="akwuq"></optgroup>
<menu id="akwuq"><nav id="akwuq"></nav></menu>
<menu id="akwuq"><menu id="akwuq"></menu></menu>
  • <xmp id="akwuq">
  • <menu id="akwuq"><strong id="akwuq"></strong></menu>
    <menu id="akwuq"><tt id="akwuq"></tt></menu>
    869722230

    869722230

    Photograph of a black hole in the milky way. Dated 2014. (Photo by: Photo 12/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

    Photo by: Photo 12/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

    Photo 12/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

    That’s a (Weirdly) Big Black Hole!

    Recently astronomers identified a black hole near a star called LB-1 and they found out that the black hole is 70 times the mass of the sun. This is a mystery because the biggest black holes we can get from the deaths of the most massive stars are around 30 times the mass of the sun, so how did black hole get this big?

    December 30, 2019

    How do you spot a black hole? They’re black, and space itself is vaguely black too. If you just look out into space and see nothing but blackness, you don’t know if you’re looking at the empty reaches of the great interstellar nothingness, or straight into the heart of one of the most enigmatic creatures in our universe.

    Astronomers have managed to solve this puzzle in a number of ways. Since we can’t see black holes directly, we have to look at clues they leave behind in the environment around them. And when it comes to black holes, the only clue they leave behind is gravity. That’s because black holes are massive, dense gravity-generating machines: all they do is pull and pull and pull.

    If a black hole happens to form in a binary star system (you should note that black holes in our universe appear to exclusively form from the deaths of the most massive stars, but that’s a story for another day), then the remaining star in that pair will still orbit its dark companion, tethered to it by chains of gravity.

    Sometimes gas from the not-dead-yet star can spill onto the sibling black hole. As all that material crowds in on itself in a headlong rush towards the ultimate abyss, it heats up and glows, emitting copious amounts of x-ray radiation. This is radiation that we can see, even from tens of thousands of lightyears away. With this technique, we can’t spot a black hole itself, but we can detect the radiation signature of all the gas spiraling in towards its doom.

    Read More

    That’s a (Weirdly) Big Black Hole! 01:43

    But not every black hole gets to feed like a parasite on a sibling star, so this method can only spot a small fraction of all the black holes out there.

    Recently, a team of Chinese astronomers tried another approach, staring at a single star (in their case, a particular star without a cool name, just the boring descriptor LB-1) over the course of a couple years. In their diligent staring, they found the star to wobble a little bit to and fro, suggesting that the star was not alone, but orbiting some unseen, dark companion.

    Through painstaking analysis of the orbit, they determined that whoever LB-1 had as a friend, it was massive, somewhere around 70 times the mass of the sun.

    And something that big couldn’t be a star, because if it was, it would’ve been blindly bright and obvious.

    It’s a black hole, 7,000 lightyears away from us.

    When it comes to black holes, this one isn’t the smallest – that honor goes to the also unfortunately-named XTE J1650-500, with a mass not even 4 times that of the sun. And LB-1 isn’t the biggest either; the most massive black hole whoppers in the universe grow to monstrous proportions of hundreds of billions times the mass of the sun.

    What’s curious about LB-1’s size is…well, its size. The giant black holes bulk up on material at the centers of galaxies, feeding for millions of years. And as far as we can tell through the process of thinking about it really hard, the biggest black hole that can form from the death of a star is around 30 or 40 solar masses.

    So how did LB-1 double its initial birth size? Did it gobble up some neighbor long ago? Is it really two black holes orbiting so tightly together we can’t tell the difference from here? Are we missing something when it comes to our understanding of how black holes form and evolve?

    This isn’t the first black hole in this mass range spotted – the LIGO gravitational wave detector has already seen a few like it – but it’s the first one that we can stare at (or at least, stare at its companion), and hopefully the more we look into the abyss, the more the abyss looks back at us.

    Next Up

    Why Does Pluto Have Such a Weird Orbit?

    Pluto is the black sheep of the planets in our solar system and it looks like astronomers aren’t sure how long Pluto will remain in its present orbit.

    2020: A Year of Big Leaps for Mankind

    Here are a variety of some amazing space launches to look forward to in 2020.

    Check Out the Crab Nebula –The Leftovers from a Giant Cosmic Firework

    The Crab Nebula sits 6,500 light-years away, and is currently about 11 light-years across. But while it looks pretty from afar, don’t give in to the temptation to visit it up close.

    Following Blue Origin’s NS-12 Rocket Launch

    Blue Origin, Billionaire Jeff Bezos’ spaceflight company, is rescheduled to launch its NS-12 reusable spacecraft on Wednesday, December 11. Watch it LIVE.

    Voyager 2 is Really Far Out There, Man

    Currently Voyager 2 is about 11 billion miles from the Earth, and has been traveling at speeds of tens of thousands of miles per hour since its launch in 1977. Read more to see where it is now and what we've learned.

    Let’s Look for Water on the Moon

    NASA is headed to the moon, but this time it's in search of water. Astrophysicist Paul M Sutter shares what this means and why it's important.

    DNA's Building Blocks May Have Their Origins in Outer Space

    One of life's building blocks could have originated in outer space. But if this experiment shows how these building blocks actually formed, how exactly did they get to Earth?

    India’s Space Agency is Going Big… By Going Small

    Astrophysicist Paul M. Sutter shares the latest in the world of rocket launches and what India’s SSLV is all about.

    The Kuiper Belt: When Solar Systems Dance

    Pluto isn't alone after all. Besides being the home of Pluto, the Kuiper belt hosts dwarf planets, and smaller bits of rock and ice.

    SpaceX vs. the Universe

    Fans of space are having a tough time picking sides over a recent controversy between SpaceX and astronomers. But what's the big debate all about? Astrophysicist Paul M. Sutter digs into both perspectives.
    38激情网